EMF PROTECTION 
How to Mitigate and Protect Yourself From Electromagnetic Fields


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EMF PROTECTION
"THE BOTTOM LINE" - STRAIGHT TALK

Peer reviewed scientific studies have demonstrated negative biological effects from exposure to EMFs. Damage from EMF exposure is cumulative. Therefore, protection requires taking steps to reduce  exposure even if you are  not currently experiencing noticeable symptoms. In most cases EMF protection is a matter of "common sense."

Avoiding exposure is called “prudent avoidance” and is the best “first line” defense for EMF protection. Simply learning what the common sources of EMFs are and eliminating such sources or keeping a reasonable distance from them goes a long way to reduce exposure.

Generally, the strength of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) reduces by the square of the change in distance. Thus, EMF protection is accomplished simply by being conscious of potential sources and distancing yourself. For example, moving from 1 ft. to 2 ft. away from a source will reduce exposure to 1/4th.  Moving from 1 ft. to 4 ft. away reduces the strength to 1/16th etc. This applies to a single source of mid to high frequency radiation. For electric power (60 Hz) magnetic and electric fields the EMR generally reduces directly in proportion to the distance. Doubling the distance from the source will cause the measured field strength to drop in half.

The process of eliminating or lowering EMF exposure in your environment by installing special materials or making repairs is called mitigation. For more details on avoidance and mitigation see “the fine print” below.

"THE FINE PRINT"

1. Make measurements to identify sources of EMF exposure (EMRs) in your environment. To learn how, follow this link How To Measure EMF”. To purchase meters click HERE.  To rent meters click HERE.

2. Eliminate sources of EMF exposure in the local environment to the extent possible. Examples are: turn off wi-fi, Bluetooth, wireless printers, Roku, smart TVs  and other wireless devices when not in use. Power strips with a switch may be used, or inexpensive timers may be used.  Eliminate or limit using microwave ovens. Keep cell phones, tablets, and similar devices on “airplane mode” or off when not in use.

3. Consider installing wired connections (Ethernet) to replace wireless equipment. It is possible for the average homeowner to do this or you may have a reputable installer do the wiring. Doing so will provide a substantial amount of EMF protection.

4. Have faulty wiring in the home repaired by a licensed electrician. Note: most electricians are unfamiliar with the EMF problem and need guidance as to what problems to look for. For detailed information on how to find and repair common wiring mistakes see  the book Tracing EMFs in Building Wiring and Grounding by Karl Riley. To purchase it CLICK HERE and scroll down to the book.

5. Install shielding materials for radio frequency sources where needed. A large degree of EMF protection can be afforded by inexpensive materials such as aluminized surface foam board or RF blocking fabrics. It is important to understand the effects of absorption, reflection, and refraction as described on my page “What Is EMF” . Shielding materials should be positioned so-as to shield the living space from outside sources of EMF exposure and in such a way to not reflect and intensify sources into the living space. This requires a thorough knowledge of all sources based on actual measurements. After installing shielding materials, EMF measurements should be re-taken to determine the effectiveness of the material. It is best to experiment with correct placement of shielding by first temporarily installing and measuring, making adjustments to achieve the best results. For example, before applying shielding paint to the walls of a room (expensive) it would be wise to purchase some quality fabric shielding (less expensive) and temporarily hang the fabric to see how much reduction can be achieved.

Remember EMF sources can be coming from many directions -through the floor, walls, and ceiling or within the room. First eliminate any sources of EMF exposure in the room, then determine whether floor and/or ceiling need shielding and which walls need to be shielded. This requires taking measurements using directional type meters which can measure the frequencies present in the room.

Also remember that just like visible light (a form of EMF) EMRs will tend to fill in behind any shielding although with less signal strength. Consider how a window shade blocks most but not all light coming into a room. Some light still gets around it. In the case of microwave radiation (as from wi-fi or cell towers) it passes through walls as well as windows, but the principle is the same.  Much of the signal is reflected or absorbed by the shielding but some will also wrap around it filling in the space behind.

6. Install power line filters such as Stetzer or Greenwave filters to clean up the “dirty electricity” in the home/business. To purchase filters click HERE.

7. Determine if the electric meter is a “smart meter”. This can be done by “googling” the model number shown on the affixed tag. Also look for an FCC (Federal Communications Commission) sticker on the meter which indicates it’s a transmitting type. If it is a transmitting type, it may be possible to have the power company replace it with an old- fashioned analog meter in which case you will need to read the meter monthly and report to the utility company. If this is not possible, then applying filters (step 5) and shielding the meter may provide adequate reduction in smart meter EMRs.

In most cases simple mitigation techniques can produce an EMF safe environment reducing EMF exposure to a minimum and need not cost a lot of money.  Start with the simplest and most cost- effective approach, then add additional mitigation as needed.